Police Auctions

The Police Auctions & Sales page contains details of police auctions within the UK. To reduce the number of items stored in the Police Property Store UK police forces dispose of recovered, seized and unwanted items via a police auction. These police auctions include vehicles, bicycles, clothing, electronics, furniture and many other items, which end up in the police property room. There are even special police car auctions. There are incredible bargains to be had at a police auction by those in the know.

UK Police Auctions: Full Listings - Click HERE

Police auctions are handled differently by different police forces. Some police forces manage their own auctions through auctioneers. The difficulty is that the list of appointed police auctioneers is constantly changing. To be kept up to date with future police auctions in your surrounding area consider using an 'alert' service.

Probably the best service of its kind for police auctions in the UK, giving users a huge advantage over others searching for bargains at a police auction can be found HERE

The products at a police auction can be brand new or grade A used condition. Certain items at police auctions might be slightly used (for example high quality push-bikes which still retain a good value). Products listed in any police auction are always available for inspection and if faulty or broken then it is clearly mentioned on the item and is reiterated at the time of auction. These auctions are a prime spot for bargain hunters as many of the items go for extremely low prices, ay under market value. The visitors to a police auctions benefit from the fact that the police forces need to clear their storage space irrespective of how little they raise from the sale of the items at the police auction.

What happens to goods handed over to the police and how do they end up in the UK auctions?

The usual practice is that the finder can have the goods back and keep them if they are not claimed within two months.

However the police may want more time, if they suspect the goods are stolen or think that the owner can be traced. The owner of the goods can claim them back up to one year after they have been handed in. If the police return the goods to the finder, the finder must retain them until a year after they were first found. If the items are found by the Police they can be sold, or disposed of at the discretion of the Chief Constable.

Useful resources for Police Auctions

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